Meeting/Event Information

Technical Talks: The Minnesota Section of AIPG holds technical talks September through May, generally the first Tuesday of the month. The talks are designed to fulfill 1 Professional Development Hour (PDH). Professional Geologists, as licensed in the State of Minnesota, are required to complete 24 PDHs every biennium licensing period, including 2 PDHs of ethics.  The technical talks feature important subjects of interest to professional geologists.

During the pandemic, we are webcasting our Technical Talks.  The cost is $10 for non-members and $5 for members. You must register by 11 AM the day of the talk to be sent the login link/information. Students may attend free of charge. Fees go toward supporting the online meeting platform and the Education Fund. Your contribution to the Education Fund helps support many activities, please see our Giving Back page.

We began using StarChapter Pay (instead of PayPal) as of February 24, 2021. StarChapter Pay is similar to PayPal and other online payment gateways.  Please follow the prompts on the registration screen.  If you run into issues or have questions, please contact us!

As always, non-members and non-geologists are welcome to attend!


Pace Analytical Services

AIPG MN Mar Meeting - Impacts of Glaciation on River Profile Morphology and Evolution!

March 02, 2021
11:45 AM - 1:00 PM

MS Teams - details included in registration receipt & emailed before the meeting

Registration for the AIPG MN Section's Tuesday, March 2, 2021 technical talk is now open online!

The April technical talk is co-hosted by the the American Institute of Professional Geologists Minnesota Section (AIPG MN Section) and the Minnesota Chapter of the Association for Women Geoscientists (AWG MN Chapter)!

Meetings are webcast-only for the next few months.

The cost is $10 for non-members and $5 for members when registering before Tuesday, March 2, 2021 at 9:00 AM Central Time. Students may attend free of charge. 

We have begun to use StarChapter Pay (instead of PayPal) today, February 24, 2021. StarChapter Pay is similar to PayPal and other online payment gateways.  Please follow the prompts on the registration screen.  If you run into issues or have questions, please contact us!

You must register by 9:00 AM Central Time the day of the talk to be sent the login link/information (otherwise check the meeting page). The meeting link information will be included in your receipt.

As always, non-members and non-geologists are welcome to attend!   

Fees go toward supporting the online meeting platform and the Education Fund. Your contribution to the Education Fund helps support many activities, please see our Giving Back page.

 

Impacts of Glaciation on River Profile Morphology and Evolution

by Shanti Penprase, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

 

Presentation Abstract

Rivers evolve in response to changes in water and sediment supply through changes in river channel long profile, or the slope of a river from its headwaters to its mouth. This channel long profile evolution is most commonly described through the stream power law and Lane’s Balance, which describe an idealized river system with a concave up channel long profile. Both of these models rest on the observation that increasing drainage basin area moving from the headwaters of a river network to the mouth, will generally result in increasing river discharge and, as a result, decreasing slope with more water available to erode bedrock and/or transport sediment. This slope-area relationship results in a concave-up river profile, where the steepest slopes are observed near the headwaters and slope decreases smoothly moving downstream.

However, headwater glaciation can act as a major, non-spatially distributed source of water and sediment to adjacent rivers. If this glacial signal dominates over local precipitation and hillslope sediment inputs, then increasing water input moving downstream should be negligible and river slope should evolve nearly linearly – as increasing drainage area will not cause a great enough change in discharge, and thus erosion, to result in the concave-up profile observed in non-glaciated rivers.

I test this hypothesis by analyzing the channel long profiles of rivers to understand the impacts of glaciation on river channel long profile. I begin by focusing on two adjacent Mississippi River tributaries, the Zumbro and Whitewater Rivers of southeastern Minnesota. Both have similar histories of change in water level at their mouth from aggradation and incision of the Mississippi River due to changes in the Laurentide Ice Sheet. However, the Zumbro River was fed by ice-sheet-sourced water and sediment at its headwaters, whereas the Whitewater catchment remained beyond the ice-sheet margin. By looking at the modern channel long profiles of these rivers, we can understand how these rivers likely evolved in response to changes in glaciation and how ice proximity may result in differing channel long profiles for these rivers. I then extend these analyses to several other rivers, including the Santa Cruz and Chalia Rivers in southern Patagonia, Argentina to better constrain the impacts of glaciation on river systems in a variety of geologic settings.

 

Biography

Shanti Penprase is a third year Ph.D. Candidate in the Earth & Environmental Sciences Department at the University of Minnesota, working with Dr. Andrew Wickert. After graduating from Carleton College in 2016 with a BA in Geology, Shanti worked in the Twin Cities for two years after graduation as a Minnesota GreenCorps Member at Freshwater Society in Saint Paul working on the Master Water Stewards Program and as a Program Assistant at Mississippi Watershed Management Organization in Minneapolis assisting with stormwater sampling and monitoring along the Mississippi River.

Shanti’s research focuses on the interactions between rivers and glaciers and her work includes field sites in Southern Patagonia, Argentina and Southeastern Minnesota. Her primary research interests involve the impacts of glacial cycling on river channel slope and profile evolution, the formation and abandonment of river floodplains, and on the post-glacial evolution of river systems. Her work also focuses on numerous geochronological tools including optically stimulated luminescence and cosmogenic nuclide dating of river sediments.

Along with her research, Shanti serves as the Student Representative for the Minnesota Chapter of the Association of Women Geoscientists and is heavily involved in the University of Minnesota Earth & Environmental Sciences Departmental community, including serving on the planning committee for the 2021 UMNEarth Student Research Symposium, a yearly event hosted by the department to highlight graduate and undergraduate research. Along with research, Shanti also enjoys yoga, baking, and long walks with her dog, Stella.


 

Tickets

$5.00 AWG MN Chapter Member Ticket

$5.00 AIPG MN Section Member Ticket

$10.00 Non-Member Ticket

$0.00 Student Ticket